Goodenough Gismo

  • Gismo39
    This is the classic children's book, Goodenough Gismo, by Richmond I. Kelsey, published in 1948. Nearly unavailable in libraries and the collector's market, it is posted here with love as an "orphan work" so that it may be seen and appreciated -- and perhaps even republished, as it deserves to be. After you read this book, it won't surprise you to learn that Richmond Irwin Kelsey (1905-1987) was an accomplished artist, or that as Dick Kelsey, he was one of the great Disney art directors, breaking your heart with "Pinocchio," "Dumbo," and "Bambi."



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Comments

Ron

T-shirts must be made:

"Imbalanced, but neurotypical."

"I'm as autistic about your Aspergers, as you are when you show your Aspergers about my autism."

"Medicated alphabetically. Today's letter is 'A'"

realpc

I wonder if an Aspergers might just be an extreme degree of scientific or artistic tendencies. A scientist or artist is usually focused on things like abstract ideas, shapes, colors, sounds, machines, etc. -- in other words, non-human aspects of the world. I wonder if there is any correlation between Aspergers, autism, etc., and creativity?

I have noticed, about myself, that I experience the most intense intimacy with things I am working on, probably a lot more than I experience in relationships. The things I work on can always be solved, fixed, conquered, completed, controlled -- eventually. In human relationships, on the other hand, we often have to give up and let things go uncorrected and unfathomed.

So I wonder if extreme extroverts love the uncertainty and chaos of human relationships, and are bored by the intense, prolonged and detailed focus required by science or art. Maybe extroverts are just as creative, but in very different ways.

How many successful scientists or artists have been extroverted versus introverted? And are Aspergers and autism just extreme and pathological degrees of introversion?

This is just speculation, based on what I experience. I think if you have trouble feeling deeply understood by other people, then working on machines, or ideas, or artistic projects, can be an alternative. You can develop the intense patience and concentration that is required.

Of course my whole theory would be proven wrong if it turns out that lots of scientists, philosophers, and artists have been very social and extroverted.

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