Goodenough Gismo

  • Gismo39
    This is the classic children's book, Goodenough Gismo, by Richmond I. Kelsey, published in 1948. Nearly unavailable in libraries and the collector's market, it is posted here with love as an "orphan work" so that it may be seen and appreciated -- and perhaps even republished, as it deserves to be. After you read this book, it won't surprise you to learn that Richmond Irwin Kelsey (1905-1987) was an accomplished artist, or that as Dick Kelsey, he was one of the great Disney art directors, breaking your heart with "Pinocchio," "Dumbo," and "Bambi."



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Comments

Ron

hmmm...you could write 'synecdoche' at 4:16 AM and know what it means is better than I could do then...but isn't your last word in this post supposed to be mean, not men? Paging Dr. Freud!

Randy (Internet Ronin)

I read something the other day that mentioned eyebrow plucking as the next big thing among young males, body shaving and self-mutilation (tattoos and piercings) having become passe. Have no idea if it is true.

Melinda

I know that if I colored my own hair, I would look like Marty Allen, the "Hello Dere!" comic. This is a callback to "luxuries you wouldn't give up even if you were broke."

Synecdoche. At last, a word I had to look up!

amba

I don't think it's even the right word. :(

Ron: Erps!

Charlie (Colorado)

I'm a little worried about that first-person pronoun myself.

Who the hell said "'I' is a verb"? Bucky Fuller maybe?

Charlie (Colorado)

I think it's the right word --- taking a part to refer to the whole. You could argue it's a metonym instead or in addition.

karen

~sigh~

1. I skipped the entire word(accidently on purpose, i think).

2. Look it UP? I can't even pronounce it!

3. I salute you, amba- congrats on doing the things that needed to get done. It reminds me of your habit to excercise- so you feel invigorated after- like brushed teeth. I could really use some of that feeling, but i'm getting there:0).

4. I was talking to a great friend that's had a depression so deep- and is healing her way back. She says she feels she has a ways to go yet, and i said i thought life was a process of searching and healing. I wondered if we were born broken- we(humans- i guess i should just say me) have such a habit of hanging onto the worst we go through- the negativity of our experiences grooving doewn our brains and seeping into our memory tissues. Are we born broken?

Yesterday, i taught kids in Catechism about Pentecost adn how we are given the tools we need through Baptism from the Holy Spirit(Catholic thing, of course). We just have to know they are there, inside of our will and choose to use them.

Have you ever heard of BioGeometrical Integration? Chiropractical care @it's most searching, healing best- IMhumbleO. Life is a process- what we really are? Only G*d knows.

Clark

Shades of William F. Buckley, Joooonyahhhhh.

Nothing like just the right word, even if it requires readers to look it up on the internets.

Rod

Karen:

I was struck by how catholic (with a small "c") your post sounded in the paragraph about being born broken. A secularist might say everyone is born with psychological and emotional predispositions (obsessive-compulsive disorder, ADD, anxiety disorder, etc. The view is not recent: one of Freud's books was titled, "The Psychopathology of Everyday Life."

An Evangelical might say Man has a sinful nature and was designed with an inability to find fulfillment without being restored into a right relationship with God through Christ's sacrifice on the Cross.

It also struck me that a Catholic would say being "born broken" was another way of describing the doctrine of Original Sin.

As the next paragraph unfolded, I realized you were behind door number three, i.e., Roman Catholic. You talked about Pentecost and the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, saying, "Catholic thing, of course."

All of that left me pondering denominationalism. (In the interests of fair disclosure, I was raised Catholic, became an agnostic, returned to Christianity through Lutherans, then eventually drifted into a more evangelical church.) My theological wanderings left me with an ecumenical world view, and a sense that most Christians think the theology of their church is more fundamentally different from others than it really is.

This was brought home to me years ago when I was a member of a startup Lutheran"mission congregation," in a new part of town. The only other church nearby was Catholic, and the Lutheran pastor and a priest from the Catholic church became friends, so they had an unusual social event involving some of the most active members of both congregations, a "Lutheran-Catholic dialog." Three Catholics and three Lutherans sat at each table, and were given statements of doctrine from recognized, very mainstream Catholic and Lutheran theologians on a series of topics, such as, "sacraments" and “grace.” However, the statements were not identified as to whether they were Catholic or Lutheran doctrine. The task for each table was to figure out which statements were Lutheran and which were Catholic. On some of the topics, it was nearly impossible. In many cases we guessed based on the presence of a word which one of us thought looked like Catholic or Lutheran jargon.

It had a profound effect on me. I concluded Catholics and Lutherans had far more in common in terms of belief than most people realized. I since learned it is also true of the differences between liturgical and non liturgical churches, such as Baptists. I don't mean there aren't difference on subjects like transubstantiation or infant baptism, but the core of belief involves much more in common. After all, we are reading the same book.

amba

Speaking of William F. Buckley . . .

Charlie (Colorado)

I wondered if we were born broken- we(humans- i guess i should just say me) have such a habit of hanging onto the worst we go through- the negativity of our experiences grooving doewn our brains and seeping into our memory tissues. Are we born broken?

Dukkha?

Sorry, couldn't resist..

karen

Charlie: so THAT'S you :0).

Lately, i'v3e been pushed and pulled in so many different ways, and none seem specifically to fit me perfectly(probably there is no such thing).

One friend is healing through G*d and reading fantastic books like- A Mindful Way Through Depression, therapy and herbology& even medication.

Another is older, maybe wiser and is into New Earth and The Secret. I can't bring myself to even read the Secret- it hink it's snotty sounding to think you posess that which everyone will pay for to gain positive energy- but, i'm going to those BGI sessions. Lord, it's confusing to try to feel good and not be in pain.

Anyway, Rod- thank you for sharing that. I know about the Original Sin aspect of broken, but i was more thinking of the stuff we humanly put ourselves through even when having an informed conscience that we should just leave alone and stay away from. I was wondering if we were energized to attract that kind of communion w/negativity. This, for me, is a switch since i like my glass 1/2 full, hold the lemon wedge(since i've seen the video that tells how full of bacteria they are).

I bonded w/a Muslim woman whom i think of often- she'd sent her two girls to the Catholic elementary school where my kids went; it's closed, now:0(. When this woman asked me to pray for her once- i was so humbled, so honoured. There are those who would saw we don't even pray to the same G*d, but she and i knew that isn't the point. Our own G*ds would honour the prayers for eachother because G*d is love.

I've often wondered what my priest, he's from Tanzania, thinks of BObama and the issue of race here in the US. He said a funeral for a great older woman of our Parish and he called her "our belov'd Mother". He knows that G*d trumps race becasue G*d is love.

I think there is not enough for Americans to do- maybe a recession and sacrifice will be good for our souls as a Country- to appreciate more what we now take for granted as a given. I wonder if that's to much to ask?

If i could be a nut, i'd be Brazilian; but, a friend always called me a walnut- 'cause i drove her up the wall:0).

Rod

Karen:

You were thinking of "the stuff we humanly put ourselves through even when having an informed conscience that we should just leave alone and stay away from.... wondering if we were energized to attract that kind of communion w/negativity."

I don't know whether we attract negativity, but we are certainly attracted to the things that will bring us down. An irony of our freedom is that we are free to be the architects of our own downfall. Ask Elliot Spitzer.

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