Goodenough Gismo

  • Gismo39
    This is the classic children's book, Goodenough Gismo, by Richmond I. Kelsey, published in 1948. Nearly unavailable in libraries and the collector's market, it is posted here with love as an "orphan work" so that it may be seen and appreciated -- and perhaps even republished, as it deserves to be. After you read this book, it won't surprise you to learn that Richmond Irwin Kelsey (1905-1987) was an accomplished artist, or that as Dick Kelsey, he was one of the great Disney art directors, breaking your heart with "Pinocchio," "Dumbo," and "Bambi."



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Richard Lawrence Cohen

Shades of Mark Twain and foreshadowings of Blaugustine. It also made me think of James Howard Kunstler's 1988 novel *An Embarrassment of Riches* and my friend Steve Stern's stories and novels about Jews in long-ago Memphis. And Charles Johnson's fiction, of course. I think you'd like all of those.

I hope Seth got through all right. We could use more like him. And thanks for the links, as always.

meade

"...a child's slight skeleton stacked in the bottommost tier of bones. At first he had thought it to be the corpse of a dwarf or a midget. It was only after the news camera had focused beyond Dachau to the beauty queen's roses that Seth's brain could accept the bare roundness for what it had been, a child's skull."

Powerful stuff, Amba... prose worthy of but few -- an R.L. Stevenson, an R. L. Cohen.

Thanks indeed.

Esta

I am currently reading "Coal Mine No. 7" and finding it tough going. Found your notes and see that you appreciate the book. . . perhaps I will persevere. Esta

amba

Esta --

Persevere if you can. It's hard to get used to the dialect, for one thing, and the eccentric quirkiness of the author's way of writing, for another. But it's great, in my opinion. Not for everyone, but if you can connect with it, great.

hope anne nathan

Wow ... My Dad wrote Coal Mine No. 7. It's kind of wonderful to see it described in such a warm way.

And I remember you (and your cats) :)

- h.

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