Goodenough Gismo

  • Gismo39
    This is the classic children's book, Goodenough Gismo, by Richmond I. Kelsey, published in 1948. Nearly unavailable in libraries and the collector's market, it is posted here with love as an "orphan work" so that it may be seen and appreciated -- and perhaps even republished, as it deserves to be. After you read this book, it won't surprise you to learn that Richmond Irwin Kelsey (1905-1987) was an accomplished artist, or that as Dick Kelsey, he was one of the great Disney art directors, breaking your heart with "Pinocchio," "Dumbo," and "Bambi."



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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference An Anthropologist in the Blogosphere:

» An Anthropologist In The Blogosphere from Booker Rising
AmbivaBlog, a moderate site, wonders when the field will study it: "However, we're still relatively close to the Big Bang of the blogosphere's origin. As a relative newcomer I'm surprised (though I shouldn't be) that it has such a distinct and consis... [Read More]

» An Anthropologist In The Blogosphere from Booker Rising
AmbivaBlog, a moderate site, wonders when the field will study it: "However, we're still relatively close to the Big Bang of the blogosphere's origin. As a relative newcomer I'm surprised (though I shouldn't be) that it has such a distinct and consis... [Read More]

» The Carnival Wire from Silflay Hraka
FoH Ambivablog compares the various carnivals to potlaches in An Anthropologist in the Blogosphere. The indefatigable Coturnix proposes a Carnival specifically for NC bloggers; The Tar Heel Tavern.... [Read More]

Comments

Dave Schuler

As I'm sure you know the blogosphere owes its gift culture aspects to the Open Source movement in which it had its origin and which pre-dated it by more than a decade.

Tamar

Here's an article I received this morning from my alma mater on this subject:
http://www.buffalo.edu/news/fast-execute.cgi/article-page.html?article=71440009

coturnix

I agree. I wrote several times about it. I also love the "Apophenia" blog as it studies this kind of stuff (you can find the link on my blogroll).

Blog Carnivals

Blogging

cooper

As a student of both anthropology and photography I am willing to bet that there is someone on it already. The competition will be fierce when they launch( these anthropological blogs of substance.
And as I pointed out for no reason yesterday in my blog, Maggie Mead was rumored to be lazy so hopefully those that decide to use their academic credentials to do an investigative and or ethographics on the blogesphere will not be so.

DirtCrashr

As a former Anthro major I see a lot of cargo-cult activity, what is really interesting to me is the archaeological aspects - the bones are fresh. ;-)

amba

I like your e-mail "address."

You should write a post expanding on that comment!

DirtCrashr

I've been away from it for quite a while, but my first thought was for the Internet in general rather than the Blogosphere, with Usenet being the lower archaeological strata, the parent-bones.
Was it a Big-Bang that started it, or a fiery meteoric paradigm-shift that crashed to earth? Is Athena the BlogGoddess who sprung forth from Zeusnet's splitting headache, and if so where is her Wisdom?
We could have a lot of fun with metaphors.
The highly competitive gift-giving of the later Potlatch tradition was economically crushing to most of the communities that participated, decimating some of them - and one of the first cases revealed by Academe of unintended consequences. That's a bit of an institutional bogyman, unintended consequences, it doesn't fit well within the settled framework of stately theorems balancing equally and diversely on victims' heads.
I'm on a couple blog-rolls that have expanded in size beyond the ability of the people to cope, and an ad-hoc Carnival that without on individual's leadership is on shaky ground.
So what are the cargo-cults? Sites promoted by conspiracy-theorists among others, things that have the semblance of science but are not - a bamboo stick looks like a radio antenna but it's not, and a white lab-coat doesn't make you an M.D. - that sort of thing.
As far as Ethnography goes, it's all about sex - the diary of Malinowski's reveals he was basically a horn-dog on a remote island. A huge percent of the Internet is devoted to sex, and the Blogosphere reflects that as well. Maybe we should acknowledge all those early, pioneering AOLers who as joke goes, "How can you tell if it's winter or summer on AOL? Whether they're wearing socks or not." Before there were Bloggers in Pajamas there were cyber-primitives with none. If Al Gore started this thing, than I imagine he was among them! Poor Tipper. ;-) The pornographers are the ones that first built bandwidth in order to bring us (HOT-HOT!) interactive streaming video, and took VOIP And pushed it so we could talk to HOT CHICKS! They actually helped defined how much of the architecture in place would work going forward - stuff now used innocently (more or less) at YouTube. Hmm... maybe that is an appropriate area for "field work," if you're a BlogSophomore? College is ubiquitous, in memory anyhow.
Thanks for letting me ramble. :-)

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